Getting started with R - best way to continue learning R

Hello all. Just started learning R from the google analytics course on coursera. Their course on R is fun and engaging. I am almost done with the course, and my next step is to finish the R for data science book.

My question is that is this a good approach to learn R and become proficient in it? Any suggestions or comments? Thank you

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After you've finished R4DS, it may be useful to find some data to just play around with and start asking your own data science questions! When new R users have had some good initial instruction, I normally tell them to just have a go at their next project using R rather than Excel or their usual tools.

If you're not in the position to do that (if you're not in a data profession, or your work is weird about using different tools, or you just can't commit to R in a professional space right now), consider the #tidytuesday data project:

Every week there's a new data set to have a go at analysing, and a supportive twitter community based around sharing analysis, visualisations and code. I personally learned a lot from playing around with these fun data sets and reading other R users' #tidytuesday GitHub repos.

Some good ones to have a look at to see the cool stuff people have done in R are:

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Awesome! Thank you so much for this great advice.

Definitely gives me direction on what to do once I am done with the R4DS book.

Same as Jack: practice.

Trying to answer questions on forums like this one is also a good way to get thinking about hard problems.

There are also websites with exercises in several fields: codewars.com for programming/algorithms, rosalind for bioinformatics (which involves a lot of string processing, some math and stats), and of course Kaggle for machine learning. It's particularly useful when once you did solve a problem, you can see what other people used (and typically there will be some high quality code there).

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